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Seed Spotlight: Red Express Cabbage

January 26th, 2011

 

Delicious, antioxidant-rich cabbage may not be the most popular vegetable in the garden, but it offers wonderful flavor and versatility that should not be overlooked, especially for warming winter meals. In season from late fall through winter, now’s the time to enjoy cabbage.

An ancestor of broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cauliflower, cabbage was once prized by ancient Egyptians and Greeks, and for centuries, during famines, cabbage was a staple that helped sustain people in need.

Red cabbage, such as our Red Express, is very low in saturated fat and cholesterol and a good source of thiamin, riboflavin, folate, calcium, iron and magnesium. It is a very good source of dietary fiber, potassium, manganese, and vitamins A, C, K and B6.

Generally used to make coleslaw, it is also perfect for Braised Red Cabbage and Apples (below), a classic German-style dish that is easy to prepare. It complements a variety of foods, such as braised meats, game birds, and pork dishes. When cooking red cabbage, it’s important to note that cabbage’s red coloring reacts to changes in Ph, so avoid cooking it in aluminum cooking vessels and include an ingredient like acidic fruit, lemon, vinegar or wine.

Braised Red Cabbage and Apples

Ingredients

2 tablespoons bacon fat

1 small onion, diced

2 large tart apples, such as Granny Smith, peeled and diced

1 small head red cabbage, cored and shredded

½ cup dark brown sugar

¼ cup cider vinegar

Kosher salt, to season

Freshly ground black pepper, to season

Preparation

Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Sauté onion in bacon fat in a large Dutch oven. When slightly caramelized, add apples; sauté for two minutes. Add cabbage, brown sugar, vinegar, salt, and black pepper. Bring mixture to a boil then cover and bake for 40 minutes or until cabbage is very soft. SERVES 6

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Garden Vegetables: A Kaleidoscope of Health

November 20th, 2010

 

Fruits and vegetables come in all shades of vibrant colors—green, orange, red, yellow and more—that will make your plate and palette pop. But did you know that each color offers health benefits as well?

Plants contain phytochemicals which protect them from things like UV rays and garden villains. These same phytochemicals help boost our immune system when consumed and have been shown to act as free radical scavengers. Here is a short list of vegetables with some of their benefits.

– Tomatoes and red bell peppers: their bright red color comes from lycopene, a carotene and caratenoid pigment. Lycopene has been considered a potential agent for prevention of some types of cancer, such as prostate cancer.

– Carrots and winter squash: their vibrant orange color comes from beta carotene, which can be converted to active vitamin A. The phytochemicals found in orange and yellow vegetables may help lower the risk of some forms of cancer, as well as help vision and heart and immune systems.

– Broccoli: its green comes from indole-3 carbinol (I3C), a compound that occurs naturally in broccoli and other green vegetables such as cabbage, Brussels sprouts, turnips, and more. I3C has been shown to inhibit the development of cancers of the breast, colon, liver, lung and stomach in some animals.

– Eggplant: it’s chock-full of anthocyanins, water-soluble vacuolar pigments that belong to the parent class of molecules called flavonoids. These anthocyanins have been shown to protect cell membranes from damage.

So much potential in small packages! The next time you eat your favorite fruit or vegetable look at its color and think about the health benefits that may come from eating it. There’s so much to appreciate and more there than meets the eye!

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