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Jerry’s Garden: Freedom is Growing Your Own Food

March 31st, 2011

 

I am a strong believer that just because you may not have land to garden, it doesn’t mean you can’t garden!  I am fortunate enough to have a couple acres, but many of us are not so fortunate.  Just because you live in the city doesn’t mean you can’t do some good old fashioned survival gardening!  You just need to adjust to your surroundings!

If you have a patio or balcony, container gardening is the way to go.  If you live on a city lot and you have, let’s say, 5 feet between you and your neighbor, hanging gutters on the side of your house and planting in them is the latest thing.  Stacked and layered raised bed gardens help save room.  Rooftop gardens are becoming a new form of community gardens.  And, of course, hydroponics is certainly becoming a favorite amongst gardeners with limited space and sunlight.

Now it’s true, there are some types of plants you can’t grow in these limited spaces and under these conditions—some plants need plenty of “leg room”, and any form of container gardening may not be enough–but the reality is, you can grow many varieties of plants this way.  And in my opinion, anything is better than nothing, right?

I mean, after all, it’s called “survival gardening”, not “plentiful gardening”, or “flourishing gardening”, or “too much to possibly eat gardening”.  The whole point is to grow enough to feed you and supply you with enough nutrients if your regular food supply were cut-off for any reason.

I often encounter friends/family and readers of mine who say, “Hmph, I just don’t have the space to grow”, and I say nonsense.  Human beings are amazing at adapting and learning to work with our circumstances.  And if you really want something hard enough, you’ll find a way to make it work.  If you want to grow your own foods, then grow your own foods—it’s as simple as that!

And the time to begin is now!  No point in putting it off.  Take a look around you, establish a plan, and implement it!  No more excuses!

About the Author

Jerry Greenfield

My number one focus is growing my own food. I don’t think that really counts as a hobby.  For some people it is, but for me, growing my own fruits and vegetables and saving my own seed is the key to survival. The only person you can count on is yourself, if you ask me. The government is trying to help us all with GMOs and welfare, but it’s all a crock. I also like to build things and read Transcendentalist authors from the 1860s.

Connect with Jerry via his blog and Facebook page: Grow Like Crazy

 

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Guest Blog: Jerry’s Garden

January 20th, 2011

One of Humble Seed’s primary objectives is to inform, educate, and inspire positive change in the world. With today’s technology, it has never been easier to convey a message or an idea. Social media outlets such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and internet blogs are becoming more influential by the day.  Here at Humble Seed, we feel very fortunate that this technology has enabled us to connect with and grow such a knowledgeable and diverse community.

Nothing highlights that more than the spectrum of  guest bloggers we have featured in the last few months. We have had Master Gardner ‘Gardening Jone’s‘ timely piece about food safety.  Dorren Pollack, Chairperson of the Phoenix Permaculture Guild, excellent article “Garden to Table in 60 Days“.  Nutritional coach, whole foods chef, speaker and author Adam Hart’s fun and informative video blog.  And Brendan Cook, Director of Sustainability for EcoAid, support for “Big Garden-Small Carbon“.

So today, we’re happy to introduce to you, Jerry Greenfield. He will be doing a once-a-month guest blog for Humble Seed. He will bring his passion, experience, and unique gardening perspective. Look for his blog post every third Thursday of the month. Now, here’s Jerry….

Hello Everybody!  It’s nice to “meet” you!  My name is Jerry Greenfield and I am the newest guest blogger for Humble Seed.  I can’t even remember at this point how Jim Mitchell (co-owner of Humble Seed) and I got to know each other, but somehow we became friends on Facebook and we’ve continued to grow our friendship over the past several months.

It seems that Jim and I share very similar views when it comes to gardening and living a green, sustainable lifestyle.  I like what he has to say, and he likes what I have to say, so I started thinking that his readers might like what I have to say too!

When I approached Jim about writing guest blogs for his site, he was more than happy to have me!  So here I am, writing my first guest blog for Humble Seed!  My bio should tell you a little about me, but I can elaborate a bit here.

I’m an old man—approaching my 57th year—and have been gardening for decades.  Okay, maybe I’m not that old, but I certainly feel it some days!  I’ve always gardened organically because I started gardening before it was even possible NOT to garden organically!  I think it’s crazy that gardening with nature and by natural means was good enough for our ancestors for thousands of years, but now most of us are in such a hurry to find new ways to garden that we’ve forgotten the fact that we couldn’t have gotten this far without the help nature has provided us.

I’m a strong believer that things are the way they are for a reason.  For example, if plants were meant to have chemicals inside of them that killed or repelled pests, then the plants would naturally have these chemicals—we wouldn’t have to genetically modify the seeds to produce these chemicals.  Another example, if plants were meant to grow faster than they do…ah…then they would, simple as that.  But plants are programmed to grow at a certain rate for a reason and messing around with their natural growth rate can be detrimental to the plant.

I think we’ve been messing around with nature for long enough and it’s time to go back to our roots.  It’s time that we start working with nature again and not against it.  It’s time that we embrace our humility and once again become humble to the seed and all of its natural wonder.

So, I hope you’ll all enjoy my guest blogs!  I plan to offer you advice, share opinions, and discuss current events pertaining to our environment, food industry, and governmental procedures concerning our health and rights to grow and consume natural and organic foods.  Above all, I will promote organic gardening as our means to survival.  Once again, thanks to Jim for allowing me to reach out to all of you, and I’ll catch-up with all of you soon!

Jerry Greenfield Expert Author-EzineArticles.com

Connect with Jerry via his blog and Facebook page: Grow Like Crazy

About Jerry Greenfield

My number one focus is growing my own food. I don’t think that really counts as a hobby. For some people it is, but for me, growing my own fruits and vegetables and saving my own seed is the key to survival. The only person you can count on is yourself, if you ask me. The government is trying to “help” us all with GMOs and welfare, but it’s all a crock. I also like to build things and read Transcendentalist authors from the 1860s.

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Growing Debt and Growing a Victory Garden

September 20th, 2010

 

Humble Seed will often point out reasons why growing your own food is important, from the freshest foods possible to a sense of personal accomplishment, but there’s another necessary reason why so many families today are turning to gardening: debt.

Today’s economy has forced many families into picking and choosing where they will spend their hard earned money, and sometimes, it can come down to what bills will be paid versus what types of meals will be put on the table. There are families feeling the pressure to buy more processed foods, because they are less expensive. Sadly, processed foods can be very unhealthy. There are also families choosing to grow their own foods, because starting from seed is inexpensive, and the yields can be high—with enough vegetables to feed your family and more for an entire growing season. Aside from the expenses of getting your garden ready and maintaining it, growing your own foods can be very economical.

If you do not have the space or yard for your own garden why not partner with a family member, friend or neighbor and create a joint victory garden? Victory gardens were first created during World War I and World War II in order to minimize the pressure on the public food supply that was caused by the wars. They were herb, fruit and vegetable gardens that were planted at families’ residences and public parks. Today, with the slowly recovering economy and continuing frustrations with the way our foods are being produced and processed, the word ‘victory’ can be an inspiration for a better and more sustainable world. With the popularity of victory gardens growing, it’s clear that people are making informed choices about where they will spend their money, how they will manage to stay afloat during the bad economy, and what foods they will feed their families.

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