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Two Ways To Store A Year Of Fresh Herbs

July 21st, 2013

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If your basil’s tall green leaves are drooping over, and your parsley’s becoming bushy and overcrowding the tomatoes – it may be time to think about storing your favorite herbs long term. Freezing herbs, especially basil, cilantro, chives, dill, parsley, and homemade pesto is a brilliant way to enjoy their fresh flavors all year round (besides, who really gets that excited about dried herbs?  Compared with fresh herbs – there is no contest!).

Our two favorite ways to store herbs are 1) as an ice cube, and 2) as an herb log. Learn the easy processes below, and you too can make summer soups, pastas and sauces full of garden fresh flavor all year round. When you get a chance, don’t forget to check out this post on re-growing chives and celery.

How To Freeze Fresh Herbs

Herb Ice Cube Instructions:

After washing the herbs, place 2-3 individual leaves, or a spoonful of chopped herbs into ice cube trays. Fill the tray half full of water, gently ensuring that the leaves stay down. If a few leaves give you trouble, the next step should alleviate the problem.

Once frozen or mostly frozen, fill the remaining cubes with water, and freeze once more. When completely frozen, place the individual blocks of ice into a zip blog baggie, or a lidded glass container. When ready to use, remove from the freezer and drop the entire ice cube into soups, stews or sauces.

Herb Log Instructions:

Remove the leaflets off of the stem, rinse the leaves, and dry them well. Place the herbs in a freezer bag, and begin compressing and rolling the bag into a log, ensuring the air has escaped. Tie with a rubber band, and freeze. When it’s frozen, remove the herbs at any time and slice as much or little as you need.

Herb harvesting tip: Always harvest the thickest stems first, leaving the thin midsummer stems time to grow stronger and more flavorful.

***Fellow gardeners: Have you tried freezing your herbs as an ice cube or log? What is your favorite way to use frozen herbs and pesto? 

 

About Us:

Humble Seed specializes in premium garden seed kits that are packaged and themed for convenience and ease. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality heirloom, non-GMO, non-hybrid, and organic seed varieties to those who choose to start from seed.

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Companion Planting: Best Friends in the Garden

February 22nd, 2011

 

Companion planting is more than planting your favorite vegetables together; it’s beneficial! When you plant flowers, herbs, and vegetables together it attracts garden hero birds and insects into your garden; birds and insects which are natural predators to those garden villains that like to eat plants. Companion planting—to attract beneficial birds and insects—is one of Mother Nature’s organic gardening methods. Aromatic flowers and herbs planted alongside vegetables also help confuse and deter garden villains that seek out specific plants.

Another benefit to companion planting is the ability to shade lower-growing, shade-tolerant plants by planting tall-growing plants near them. By shielding lower-growing, shade-tolerant plants with tall-growing plants, this will result in higher yields. One example is planting corn next to squash.

Here are some Humble Seed plants, perfect for companion planting for a harmonious garden:

Bull’s Blood Beet pairs well with White Spear Bunching Onion.

Rose Tomato pairs well with Scarlet Nantes Carrot, Purly Chives, White Spear Bunching Onion, and Titan Parsley.

Scarlet Nantes Carrot pairs well with Purly Chives, Black Seeded Simpson Leaf Lettuce, Common Sage, and Rose Tomato.

Tuffy Acorn Squash and Yellow Crookneck Squash pair well with Double Standard Corn and Nasturtium (an annual flower).

Companion planting increases the biodiversity of your garden, and certain plants most definitely benefit when other plant species are planted near them. This spring give companion planting a whirl!

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