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Humble Seed’s Herb Guide To Cooking

July 20th, 2014

 

Caprese Salad

If you’re new to cooking with herbs, adding them to dishes and combining them with other flavors can feel intimidating. In this guide, we’ll explain everything you need to know about cooking with herbs – from what meat and produce it compliments, to which flavors it pairs well with, and a few recipe ideas also. We’re wondering: which herbs are your favorite to use? Which dishes with fresh herbs does your family love? 

Superbo Basil This Genovese-type of basil provides thick leaves and wonderful flavor.

Compliments: Chicken, lamb, roast beef, turkey, berries, tomatoes, fresh mozzarella cheese

Pairs well with: Fennel, thyme, and oregano

Recipe ideas: Basil tastes best when uses fresh. Use as a garnish, in pesto sauces, stir fries, marinara sauces, and Italian dishes. 

Purly Chives This chive variety grows leaves that are straight and upright, with pretty globe-shaped blooms that make delicious garnishes. Purly chives offer a mild onion flavor, and it is an easy-to-grow herb, perfect for containers or the garden. 

Compliments: Steak, veal, red meat dishes, tuna, potatoes, eggs, and a variety of vegetables like asparagus and bokchoy. 

Pairs well with: paprika, chopped parsley, tarragon, chives, and marjoram 

Recipe ideas: As garnish, in beef stew, soups, mixed in mashed potatoes, potato salads, baked potatoes, omelets, and salad dressings

Santo Cilantro This quick growing cilantro is a classic herb that is very versatile. For a continuous supply of fresh cilantro leaves, direct seed every three to four weeks. Cilantro leaves provide more flavor before plant flowers. 

Compliments: Chicken, beef, grilled fish, pork, black beans, avocados, corn, and tomatoes 

Pairs well with: Allspice, cumin, cardamom, ginger, lime, chili peppers 

Recipe ideas: As garnish, in salsas, Mexican dishes, sausages, and stuffings – also used in some baking dishes. 

Cumin While this plant grows best in warmer regions, cumin will grow in northern areas if seed is started early. Cumin’s foliage is similar to dill and sometimes confused with caraway, and cumin’s flavor is commonly mistaken for other herbs, and other herbs for it, due to problems in translation from the languages of the lands where its cultivation and use are common. Young leaves add great flavor to salads. For many Indian and Mexican dishes, cumin is a must-have ingredient. 

Compliments: Salmon, pork, chicken, avocados, tomatoes, mixed vegetables, cabbage, and chickpeas 

Pairs well with: ginger, turmeric, chili powder, garlic, coriander

Recipe ideas: Stirred in avocado dips and chili, commonly found in Moroccan dishes, Mexican dishes, Indian dishes

Bouquet Dill Bouquet—the most popular dill variety—produces highly flavorful leaves and seeds. The seeds are great to use as a pickling spice. Dry dill leaves for use later.

Compliments: Chicken, fish, eggs, carrots, cucumber, green beans, potatoes, and yogurt

Pairs well with: garlic, onion

Recipe ideas: Quiche, sprinkled on grilled salmon, mixed in potato and carrot salads, commonly found in Greek dishes and Scandinavian dishes

Bronze and Green Fennel  This non-bulbing type of feathery fennel offers bronze-red and dark green foliage. The sweet flavored leaves make a great addition to salads, soups and stews, and fennel leaves make a pretty garnish. For medicinal purposes, fennel seeds are used in teas and tinctures and also as a digestive aid, expectorant and a spleen, kidney, and reproductive tonic.

Compliments: Pasta, jicama, chicken, pork, potatoes, 

Pairs well with:  citrus, anise, cinnamon, black pepper corns, basil, mint

Recipe ideas: Roasted chicken, pasta dishes, topped on pizza, baked in a potato casserole, topped on pork tenderloin, mixed in a lightly steamed bean salad

Greek Oregano This Greek oregano is more pungent than common oregano, and it is prized by chefs for its aroma, flavor and versatility.This Greek oregano is great for container gardening

Compliments: Marinated vegetables, tomatoes, white meat, beef, fried fish, roast beef

Pairs well with: garlic, olive oil, parsley, chili flakes, bay leaves, marjoram, fennel, basil and thyme

Recipe ideas: Sprinkled on pizza, stirred in tomato sauces, Italian dishes

Titan Parsley Titan parsley grows into upright, compact plants that provide good uniformity and yield. Although this parsley is a biennial, the flavor is best in the first year, thus it is grown as an annual. The flat leaves that this parsley produces makes them great for garnishing dishes

Compliments: Chicken, fish, red meat, potatoes, eggs, a variety of vegetables 

Pairs well with: Basil, chives, and tarragon

Recipe ideas: Sprinkled on casseroles and pasta dishes for color, stirred in soups, minced and added to mixed, sautéed vegetables 

Common Sage Use sage’s flavorful grey-green leaves to season beans, cheese, meats, pork, poultry, sauces, sausages, and more. Sage is also used as a digestive and nerve tonic. Sage plants are good for containers, and they make an excellent border plant for an herb garden. Replant sage every 3 years as it naturally dies off after 5 years.

Compliments: Sweet potatoes, pork, white meat, sausage, beef, cheese, apples, winter produce

Pairs well with: lemon

Recipe ideas: Tastes best when cooked with butter, top on baked sweet potatoes, add to stuffing, sausage, roasts, pork tenderloin, cheeseburgers

Ginger Winter Thyme Thyme goes with just about anything, and this is the herb to use if you’re a new cook!

Compliments: Poultry, grilled fish, roast beef, pork, lamb, egg, mushrooms, mixed vegetables

Pairs well with: Bay leaves, cilantro, oregano, marjoram, rosemary

Recipe ideas: French dishes, grilled fish, omelets, quiche, seafood chowder, soups, sprinkled on mixed vegetables

About Us:

Humble Seed specializes in premium garden seed kits that are packaged and themed for convenience and ease. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality heirloom, non-GMO, non-hybrid, and organic seed varieties to those who choose to start from seed. We’re also proud to say we have taken the Safe Seed Pledge!!

Does starting your first garden seem too overwhelming or you simply don’t have the space? The Tower Garden may be the answer for you!  Passionate about gardening and healthy living, or looking to expand your current health-based business? Consider becoming a Tower Garden distributor! Email info@humbleseed for more information or message us on Facebook.

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Garden Hero: The Lovely Ladybug

July 16th, 2010

 

With their richly colored orange-red wings and distinct black spots, lovely ladybugs often conjure up childhood memories of placing one on your hand or arm then intently watching it with fantastical awe. This beautiful bug is adored by many children for its calm nature, but it’s also adored by gardeners for its beneficial pest control behavior.

Ladybugs have colossal appetites and not only consume aphids—lice that feed on plant juices—but also eat other insects and larvae, including leaf hoppers, mealybugs, mites, whiteflies, and the eggs of the Colorado potato beetle, just to name a few. One ladybug, in its lifetime, can consume more than 4,000 aphids, their preferred meal.

In addition to consuming aphids and other insects, ladybugs require pollen as a source of food, in order to mature and lay eggs. Some plants that attract ladybugs include basil, cilantro, dill, fennel, pepper, thyme, and tomatoes. If you want to be extra considerate of your little garden heroes, consider planting bell-shaped flowers, such as lilies or tulips, which capture drinking water for ladybugs and provide a cool, relaxing oasis for them to inhabit. With the garden protection that ladybugs provide, they deserve to be pampered!

If you’re interested in using the heroic ladybug to help combat the villains in your garden, it is important that you not use insecticides—which you should try to avoid regardless. Insecticides will not only eliminate most of their food source but also discourage ladybugs from laying their eggs in your garden.

If purchasing ladybugs for your garden, do not release them during the heat of the day. Keep them in a cool place, such as the refrigerator, before releasing them in the evening after the sun goes down. Placing your ladybugs in the refrigerator will not harm them but simply slow them down. Ladybugs do not fly when it’s dark, so this is your best chance at giving them the opportunity to get comfortable in their new living environment. Also, before releasing the ladybugs, water the areas that you will be placing them in so they have plenty of water to drink. Think of ladybugs as house guests; you want them to feel welcomed and comfortable. If your ladybugs are comfortable in their new home, chances are they’ll stick around. You can’t fence ladybugs in, but should they choose to stay and live in your garden they’ll be great heroes in combating those villainous aphids and their sidekicks.

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Bean Soup with Fennel

March 22nd, 2010

1 1/2 cups dried navy beans, soaked overnight
1 pound smoked ham hocks
8 cups water
2 large bunches of fennel leaves, stems snipped off
5 garlic cloves, minced
1 onion, finely chopped
1 bay leaf
3 teaspoons black pepper
3 large potatoes, chopped
1 bunch green onions, chopped, white parts only
1 cup chopped cabbage
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 pound ground pork sausage, browned and drained

Place beans, ham hocks and water in a large pot; bring to a boil then reduce heat. Simmer ingredients until beans can be mashed and pork is tender, about 1 hour. Chop fennel until you have about 2 cups; set aside. Add garlic, onion, bay leaf and pepper to pot; simmer 5 minutes. Add chopped fennel, potatoes, green onion, cabbage, olive oil and cooked sausage to pot. Return soup to a boil then reduce heat and simmer for about 20 minutes, until vegetables are tender. Discard bay leaf before serving.

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