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Re-Grow Chives and Celery In 3 Easy Steps!

September 6th, 2012

Calling all thrifty gardeners! Did you know you can completely re-grow celery and chives by saving the bottom piece that is often thrown away? Take growing your own food to the next level and try this simple trick (and save money!).

Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Remove the top edible portion of the celery or chives. It’s your choice whether you prefer to use the top portion as you need it, or to remove the top portion all at once after it’s harvested.

Step 2: Place the root end(s) in a shallow glass of room temperature water.

Step 3: If you are re-growing chives, leave the glass near a sunny window. Within a week, you will be able to harvest the flavorful green ends. Be sure to change the water every few days.

If you plan to re-grow celery, leave the celery in the shallow glass for only 2-4 days, or until you notice small leaves growing at the top. Transplant the celery to your garden. The celery will begin to grow stalks within a few weeks. If you find the celery needs further support as it grows, remove the top and bottom of a clean plastic soda bottle, and place it around the plant.

Get the Kiddos Involved!

On an uneventful weekend, this is a wonderful “experiment” to do with the kids. They’ll be fascinated by how fast both the celery and chives re-grow on their own! One blogger commented that she was amazed when her children would run out to the garden to “sneak” a celery stalk. Getting the kids involved not only sparks their imagination, but promotes healthy eating as well!

Looking to plant more vegetables and herbs this fall? Our Uncle Herb’s Favorites and Veggin’ Out seed kits have a variety of organic and heirloom seeds to get you started.

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Colony Collapse Disorder and Vanishing of the Bees

August 24th, 2010

If you know anything about bees, then you’re probably familiar with Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Colony Collapse Disorder is an unusual phenomenon where bees abandon their hives, never to return.

What is frightening about CCD is that we’re not talking about a few thousand bees here or there. Just in the winter of 2006/2007, tens of billions of bees—more than a quarter of the United States’ bee colonies—were lost to CCD, and since then, more than three million bee colonies have disappeared.

When you think about the number of bee colonies that have been lost to CCD then wonder how our agricultural crops will be pollinated should this problem worsen, it’s hard not to think the word “catastrophic.”

In estimation, insects pollinate one third of the human food supply, most of which is pollinated by bees. In case you need a pollination refresher: Bees land on a flower to eat nectar and pollen. While on the flower, the bee will stuff powdery pollen into little sacks on the back of her legs. When the bee flies to another flower, some of the dusty pollen falls off her legs onto the new flower she’s landed on, thus beginning the plant pollination process (fertilization and sexual reproduction). Pollination is vital, because fruiting of a plant is dependent on fertilization.

Imagine the catastrophic consequences if crops such as apples, asparagus, avocados, broccoli, blueberries, cantaloupe, celery, citrus, cucumbers, nuts, peaches, and more were unable to fruit, due to lack of pollination, due to the lack of bees. It’s a very scary thought.

We’ve uprooted a very real bee movie that we hope everyone will get the opportunity to watch: Vanishing of the Bees. Check out the trailer.

http://www.vanishingbees.com/

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