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What To Plant In October

September 27th, 2013

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Unless you’re living in California and Florida and are essentially free of frost, it’s important to be mindful of your first frost date when it comes to October sowing. Typically, the first frost in most regions will begin at the end of October. This means that it’s a wise idea to start preparing your garden…right now!

If each season you’re feeling stumped on what to plant and when, run (don’t walk!) and check out our Humble Seed Garden Planner. This clever slide chart has a variety of features; including the critical frost dates in your specific region. To make your garden even further fail-proof, the planner also shows planting depth, distance between rows, and the distance between plants after thinning for 22 different popular vegetable varieties.

What To Plant Right Now

Asparagus – These vegetables thrive in areas with winter ground freezes and dry seasons. Essentially if you’re living in anywhere other than Florida and the Gulf Coast, go ahead and plant in October. While it takes some time until harvest, crisp asparagus stems smothered in butter is well worth the wait.

Beets, Turnips and Radishes – Root crops can take a little frost, but be sure to continue protecting them from the extreme cold to extend the season if you plant in October.

Broccoli – This versatile vegetable not only likes cool weather, it tends to taste better when grown in down right chilly weather. Cloth cover these guys on the coldest nights, but don’t fret too much if your region has moderately cold winter weather.

Brussels Sprouts – While  slow growing, Brussels sprouts truly prefer cooler weather and will not give you trouble if you plant in October AND live in the Pacific Northwest (“the fog belt”) where they tend to grow best.

Onions, Scallions, Shallots  – Depending on the variety of Allium, there are quite a few to choose from that will hold up well during frost and can be planted safely in areas with moderate winter climates.

Peas – These little veggies prefer October sowing in cool soil that is not overly fertilized (they tend to reject too much nitrogen). Go ahead and sow in October, and enjoy a variety of winter soups all season.

Winter Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Cabbage, Kale and Spinach – Hardy leafy greens are the soul of winter! Sow a really hardy variety and be mindful to not overwater. Protecting these leafy greens from the cold is essential, so try using fleece covers or winter lights to help provide additional warmth if you plant in October.

Readers, we’d love to ask you: What are you planting in October? 

About Us:

Humble Seed specializes in premium garden seed kits that are packaged and themed for convenience and ease. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality heirloom, non-GMO, non-hybrid, and organic seed varieties to those who choose to start from seed.

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Colony Collapse Disorder and Vanishing of the Bees

August 24th, 2010

If you know anything about bees, then you’re probably familiar with Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Colony Collapse Disorder is an unusual phenomenon where bees abandon their hives, never to return.

What is frightening about CCD is that we’re not talking about a few thousand bees here or there. Just in the winter of 2006/2007, tens of billions of bees—more than a quarter of the United States’ bee colonies—were lost to CCD, and since then, more than three million bee colonies have disappeared.

When you think about the number of bee colonies that have been lost to CCD then wonder how our agricultural crops will be pollinated should this problem worsen, it’s hard not to think the word “catastrophic.”

In estimation, insects pollinate one third of the human food supply, most of which is pollinated by bees. In case you need a pollination refresher: Bees land on a flower to eat nectar and pollen. While on the flower, the bee will stuff powdery pollen into little sacks on the back of her legs. When the bee flies to another flower, some of the dusty pollen falls off her legs onto the new flower she’s landed on, thus beginning the plant pollination process (fertilization and sexual reproduction). Pollination is vital, because fruiting of a plant is dependent on fertilization.

Imagine the catastrophic consequences if crops such as apples, asparagus, avocados, broccoli, blueberries, cantaloupe, celery, citrus, cucumbers, nuts, peaches, and more were unable to fruit, due to lack of pollination, due to the lack of bees. It’s a very scary thought.

We’ve uprooted a very real bee movie that we hope everyone will get the opportunity to watch: Vanishing of the Bees. Check out the trailer.

http://www.vanishingbees.com/

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